Participate reflection

Participate

I am writing this post as a reflection on Participate module of Georgia Online Professional Leaning course. 

 

Being a student centered, connected educator is a process, an ongoing journey,  requiring us to act in our student’s best interest, stop, reflect, modify the course and repeat as necessary.  Having taught in hybrid classrooms, I am not a stark newcomer to online education.  On the other hand, I am not a digital native either.  My journey as an online educator is in its nascent stage.  As such, I would like to follow my own advice:

 

Upon joining a new community, refrain from showing off. Listen, Observe, Learn. Collaborate. Be a Servant Leader, not a bugle blower. – Purviben K. Trivedi-Ziemba

 

At this stage, I am listening, learning, observing and collaborating. 

@One LogoI am adding to my tool box by being a student again. e.g., enrollment in Georgia Online Professional Learning Course, Reflective Writing Club from @ONE   and Edublogs Teacher Challenges.

 

I am following the master educators including Kevin Hogdson, Shanaya, the Science Teacher and Samaj Shah.  Rather than reinventing the wheel, I can use their tried and true strategies such as math munch, Whole Class test  and Periodic table Game.

 

Slice of LifeI have joined online communities including twitter and Connected Learning MOOC.  I am establishing digital presence by collaborating with peers by participating in Slice of Life. 

 

I am mentoring students across the continent for digital communities such as 100 Word Challenge and Student Blogging Challenge 2018.

 

The Participate Module has taught me that ideal digital learning communities (Ideal DLC) are not created in a vacuum.  It requires:

 

deal DLC is interconnected

 

What have participate module taught me about empowering students? 

Let us look at my blog posts  for the module and my resources to answer this:  First, we need to talk about Netiquette and how rules of real world applies to digital world as well.

 

 Next, We should discuss digital safety and security. We will use this poster to talk about need for precaution, steps to take against cyber bullying and digital vigilance.

Acceptable use policy, joining a reputable DLC and collecting reputable digital resources goes hand in hand. Students can use the symbaloo to bookmark their web searches and use them later.  At this time, we will discuss giving credit when credit is due, creative commons and attributions and checking the resources.

 

Besides being an empathetic educator who practices being firm & fair, leveling the playing field for my students and getting to know them, I am planning to use strategies similar to Mr. Hodgson to entice the students to learn.  

 

The lesson that benefited me most was the Accessing Digital Learning Communities

 

 

Let us review this YouTube video from WebAIM to review how disability hampers access to the digital community.

 

 

ASD Introduction to Web Accessibility Video Transcript

 

After reviewing Web Accessibility in Mind (WebAIM) , I am more aware of making sure that I need to make the material (s) I create for my students meets the principles of accessibility guidelines: Content should be perceivable, clear and understandable; I should make sure to have assistive technology available so the students can have access to the material using all senses and they may access material (Operable & Robust). I used to have funky fonts and layouts.  Now, I tried to stay with fonts such as Vardana, good color scheme (No lime green text if possible) to aid my visually impaired student, so they can read the material without straining their eyes. 

  

What have I learned that I want to pass on from Participate module to my students & peers?

 

Be Kind. Use common sense. Be vigilant & gide your privacy.. Be mindful of your digital footprint,

 

 

 

 

#CCCWrite Conference

I am pa@One Logoparticipating in Reflective Writing Club, a six week collaborative experience offered by Online Network of Educators.  This Post is written as a reply to prompt for Week #2, conference.

Going to in-person conference has multiple benefits.  It allows an educator to network, learn new skills, interact with some awesome colleagues and present their ideas to a wider audience.  Attending a conference may introduce the attendee to rock stars of the field and open up doors they even did not know existed.  Did I mention the goodies we can bring home at end of the conference?

On the other hand, the cost of attending conferences and the time away from family may make attending one prohibitive.  e.g., as an independent educator, attending 2018  NCTM  Annual conference and Exposition  in Washington DC will cost me

Cost of attending 2018 NCTM conference & Exposition

$2485.  Not a small chunk, Ya?  

Does that mean, I stay away from attending conferences? 

No, I do attend local conferences when:

  1. Attending a conference is NOT cost prohibitive.
  2. It does not keep me away from my family for a long time.
  3. It gives me bang for my buck.

 

University of ScoutingRecently I attended University of Scouting, a one day conference run by Samoset Council of Boy Scouts of America.  This volunteer led conference is aimed at teaching the Adult Scout Leaders and Scouts leadership and personal skills; from Cub Scouts to Commissioners, there is something for everyone.  The Registration fee was reasonable: $11 for Adult leaders and $6 for a Scout.  The commute to conference was not even a concern; a 45 minutes drive each way gave Awesome & me much needed time to talk as well as listen to Heart & Soul by Maeve Binchy.  Win-Win all around, ya?  At this conference, I was a presenter for 3 sessions and a student for 2 sessions.  The learning did not stop at the end of the conference.  I will share the knowledge by offering additional sessions to my troop, mentoring and  sharing during committee meetings.

Conference & Digital  Citizenship:

In past, going to conference was synonym with in-person conference.  Now, digital citizenship allows several alternatives.  Sometimes, the conferences are live streamed or recorded and available at a later date.  Let me share some of the alternatives I came across and may have participated in this year:

Alternatives: 1. Online Conferences 2. Webinars 3. Twitter Chats 4. Blogging Challenges 5. Visit other blogs

 

 

Online Conferences saves travel time and cost while giving many benefits of in-person conferences.  e.g., Global marathon, Smithsonian- Symbols of Diplomacy.  

Webinars can be equivalent to a session or a full day conference.  Supporting Students Digitally

Twitter chats can act as mini-conferences and is a great tool for professional development.  I find #Edchat,  #mschat, and #MtBos  good resources for networking.

A finch looking for nutrition on thistle plantBlogging Challenges are opportunities to present my voice to wider audience and connect with other educators.  We can also use comments as mini-conferences. I have reached more educator-writers in 20 days of  Slice of Life Challenge than in previous 2 months.  

Visiting Other educator’s blogs are like attending key note speeches and presentations to gain exposure to ideas.  Kevin and Sam Shah not only teach me something new each time I visit their blog, they make me widen my horizon by introducing me to new concepts and other bloggers. Networking anyone?

What are your views on conference and its impact on you?

 

 


NCTM = National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Prompt for the Reflective Writing Club Week 2

Conferences:

What was the last conference you had attended in person?

Attending the

Conferences play a big role in expanding and nurturing an educator’s Personal Learning Network.

  • Discuss the role that attending conferences plays in your professional learning
  • Reflect on one valuable conference experience you had and discuss why you found it valuable.
  • Let us know what happens once your conference experience is over. Do you share what you’ve learned and, if so, how and with whom?

#CCCWrite

Recess

Slice of Life hosted by https://twowritingteachers.org/I am participating in Slice of  Life Challenge hosted by Two writing Teachers.  Every Tuesday and during whole month of March, we write & share, we visit other participant’s  blogs, we use comments as mini-conferences to connect.  Today’s slice is germinated from  walking home in recess  by Joanne Toft.  Won’t you come & join us too?

 

Walking Home in Recess

 

SOL#18 Lunchbox series-

Walking Home & Trouble

Joanne, you talked about it

As a punishment with sweet end

You are making me think: 

 

Do kids walk home from School during recess anymore?

Or is it too much trouble? 

Releasing the charges, half an hour or more?  

It is not heard anymore.

 

I remember, 

I remember, the days when kids were free

To re-access in Recess

 

Free, Free, Free

To tumble, to jumble and just be

Recess was a joy to be.

Read in a corner? Go ahead & be

Playing to your heart’s desire, Why not?

Talking, joking, Recess is the time to be

Racing home in recess? You are free.

 

Free, Free do do what you want

Playing time, Rapping time, Napping time,

Jump ropes, Satodiyu & Whatever you do, 

Just come back to class with bell ringing

 

I remember, 

The recess, the joy!

Sharing our lunchboxes,

in school garden, on terrace,

where ever one wish to sit.

No cafeteria food to consider

Mom’s lunch was the wonder.

 

 

Recess Re-access

While I sat & read in corner, 

My cousin did her numbers (in mathematics)

Sis was the one to play 

friend or two ran home to feed the pet.

 

Glorious recess. 

Where are you?

Without any minders, 

Let kids be kids.

So they can remember 

Recess as a time of wonder.

– Purviben K. Trivedi-Ziemba

 

 

 

 

Reflection on #CCCWRITE

@One LogoJust yesterday, I had started on a 6 week journey of Reflective Writing Club.   The final prompt is reflection on our passage.

My goal for participating in the reflective writing club were: 

  1. To grow as a person and an educator
  2.  Connect with colleagues and learn from them
  3. Challenge myself and share my ideas with peers

What have I learned from it? Have I achieved my goals?

Six week may seem like a long time, but for me it passed before I can blink.  Yes, I did achieve each of this goals a little.  I visited many of my colleagues blogs and gain insights from their knowledge and am learning to integrate technology with sound education.  I am able to connect with wonderful Sheri Edwards and always graceful Laura Gibbs to name a few.  I realized that I have a lot of ideas and yet struggle with deadlines.  

Over the six weeks, I found out that I am spending way too long time forming and publishing my posts.  At times, I looked at the prompt and over thought my responses.  to meet the deadlines, I need to have better plan and time management.  I am a new blogger. Experience, being comfortable in my skin, learning about new techniques  and applying them to my posts will help me.  Baby Steps is the name of the game here.  I also need to know when to tweak the plan and get similar reason.  e.g., while writing Does My Mother Knows My Despair? I was trying to add a picture with text. I spend almost  two hours on learning about it.  I have still not got hold of it.  Rather than spending any more time on it, I decided to modify my plan and added the poem as document in the post.  In nutshell, I need to 

Allocate time to write a post, stop overthinking, stick to the plan, write the post, publish the  post before the deadline

Sometimes, reading the post from my peers was like looking in the mirror of my thoughts; they had written exactly what I was writing.  Then I wrassle with Do I scrap my post?  Do I continue?  At other times, my colleagues had a different way to look at the same prompt.  Who knew a prompt for unplugging can be responded to as un-driving but Laura Gibbs did just that and in the process taught us a thing or two.  I learned that

There are multiple ways to answer a prompt. Be bold. Be reflective. Be free to look at new angles. Share with abundance

Overall, I enjoyed the experience.  I am looking forward to other professional development from @One. 

Are you participating in Reflective Writing Club?  Another challenge?  What are your thoughts on it? 

 

#CCCWrite

Participate reflection

I am writing this post as a reflection on Participate module of Georgia Online Professional Leaning course. 

Participate

 

 

Being a student centered, connected educator is a process- an ongoing journey where one need to act, stop, reflect, modify the course and repeat as necessary.  Having taught in hybrid classrooms, I am not a stark newcomer to online education.  On the other hand, I am not a digital native either.  My journey as an online educator is in its nascent stage.  As such, I would like to follow my own advice:

 

Upon joining a new community, refrain from showing off. Listen, Observe, Learn. Collaborate. Be a Servant Leader, not a bugle blower. – Purviben K. Trivedi-Ziemba

 

At this stage, I am listening, learning, observing and collaborating. 

 

The Participate Module has taught me that ideal digital learning communities (Ideal DLC) are not created in a vacuum.  It requires:

 

deal DLC is interconnected

 

What have participate module taught me about empowering students? 

Let us look at my blog posts  for the module and my resources to answer this:  First, we need to talk about Netiquette and how rules of real world applies to digital world as well.

 

 Next, We should discuss digital safety and security. We will use this poster to talk about need for precaution, steps to take against cyber bullying and digital vigilance.

Acceptable use policy, joining a reputable DLC and collecting reputable digital resources goes hand in hand. Students can use the symbaloo to bookmark their web searches and use them later.  At this time, we will discuss giving credit when credit is due, creative commons and attributions and checking the resources.

 

Besides being an empathetic educator who practices being firm & fair, leveling the playing field for my students and getting to know them, I am planning to use strategies similar to Mr. Hodgson to entice the students to learn.  

 

The lesson that benefited me most was the Accessing Digital Learning Communities

 

 

Let us review this YouTube video from WebAIM to review how disability hampers access to the digital community.

 

 

ASD Introduction to Web Accessibility Video Transcript

 

After reviewing Web Accessibility in Mind (WebAIM) , I am more aware of making sure that I need to make the material (s) I create for my students meets the principles of accessibility guidelines: Content should be perceivable, clear and understandable; I should make sure to have assistive technology available so the students can have access to the material using all senses and they may access material (Operable & Robust). I used to have funky fonts and layouts.  Now, I tried to stay with fonts such as Vardana, good color scheme (No lime green text if possible) to aid my visually impaired student, so they can read the material without straining their eyes. 

  

What have I learned that I want to pass on from Participate module to my students & peers?

 

Be Kind. Use common sense. Be vigilant & gide your privacy.. Be mindful of your digital footprint,